Sustainable brands you need to know of

Considering how much we are warned of global warming, pollution, and many other worldwide issues on a daily basis, it’s quite surprising how little sustainable brands are vastly heard of (baring the few that have managed to break this system such as Reformation or Sezane of course). Even whilst I was creating this blog post, I was shocked at how hard it was to find fully sustainable or even ethical clothing brands that didn’t have such an unimaginable price tag. Now of course sustainability is all about investing in good quality pieces and you’re paying for what you get, but not all of us can afford the luxury life. Despite the vast searching and messaging to each individual company, here are some beautiful, ethical brands that really deserve the recognition and your pay check (not all of it thankfully).

House of Sunny

https://www.houseofsunny.co.uk

Do you ever see those really unique looking pieces that float around Instagram and you just have to pause and admire the stand out qualities of them that you rarely see on the high street? Yeah, they’re from House of Sunny. Although this brand is small as a team and is still in its youth as an established company, they’re certainly taking the world by storm, one limited collection at a time.

Instagram: @houseofsunny

House of Sunny focuses on creating superb quality garments that will truly not be found anywhere else besides in house itself, and so they’re not afraid to experiment with new design features and modern styles that can be made wearable for the everyday by those who aren’t afraid to stand out a little. They focus on creating small and limited runs of each collection to keep any waste to a minimum, and any sample pieces or items with minor defects that can’t be sold at full price can be found on their depop at a discount.

By Megan Crosby

https://bymegancrosby.com

Megan Crosby is a young designer from Portsmouth, who’s brand focuses on mid level fashion that is of high quality and at an affordable price point. Megan launched her brand after graduating from the Arts University Bournemouth, creating a debut capsule collection that serves both the satisfaction of beautiful fashionable pieces, whilst offering a guilt-free experience due to the consciousness of the environment.

Instagram: @bymegancrosby

Her brand is centred around bright colours and fun prints, in silhouettes that are super flattering and wearable for either everyday wear or as a little something special for every now and then. She also offers a fully customisable experience, meaning that you can provide your exact measurements or preferences in finer details like zips and closures, to really make that piece just right.

Olivia Rose The Label

http://www.oliviarosethelabel.com

Olivia Rose Havelock is an independent designer that created her ethereal clothing label back in January 2017. A textile design graduate from the Chelsea College of Art and Design, she now hand makes her designs in her Edinburgh studio, with every step of the process being ethically sourced and produced by herself.

Instagram: @oliviarosethelabel

Her romanticised sleeves and silky fabrics are truly gorgeous and are definitely the kinds of pieces that will make you look luxurious and feel luxurious. Each hand crafted garment is made with considerable amounts of care and patience, meaning that these stunning dresses will last you for plenty of events to come.

LackLustre Embroidery

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/lacklustreembroidery

Sick of going into H&M to find cheesy or badly done embroidered slogan t-shirts? Then I’ve got the solution for you. LackLustre Embroidery is a one woman sustainable embroidery business, focusing on t-shirts and patches. Her designs are fun and sometimes cheeky, whilst still making them wearable.

Instagram: @lacklustreembroidery

These t-shirts are the perfect boxy everyday fit, and they’re also made out of 100% cotton, meaning you might end up falling asleep in them later on in the day because they’re just as good as being in pyjamas. Many of her pieces also come in a range of colours, so whether you’re a fan of colour or not, there’s definitely something for you.

Veronica Velveteen

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/VeronicaVelveteen?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=687414340

Veronica Velveteen is a lil independent fashion brand based down in Portsmouth that creates vintage style pieces with actual vintage fabric (doesn’t get much better than that). The brand features plenty of wearable yet exciting pieces that are also super affordable, yet when you think that brands like ASOS or Topshop would charge the same amount for pieces that haven’t been well made, won’t fit right etc, you’d be mad not to check out this stuff.

Instagram: @veronicavelveteen

P.S. wanna be sustainable but don’t really fancy buying someone else’s second hand underwear? Veronica Velveteen creates stunning handmade pieces in luxurious fabrics to make you feel 10/10 whilst also not costing an arm and a leg! That means you could stock up on 3-4 pairs of these gorgeous things for the same price as one ‘fancy’ pair from Victoria’s Secret that you know you are too uncomfortable to wear anyway.

So, there’s my range of sustainable yet affordable brands that I have to share with you today. Please do give each of them a looking into as you definitely won’t be disappointed!

Love,

Sophie x

Not your everyday fashion bloggers

Greetings friends hope you’re all well. I got asked recently if I had any Instagram fashion ‘influencers’ or bloggers that I admire and that they I feel inspired by from time to time, and it got me thinking about the fact that many of the people that we see on fashion brand’s instas all follow a very similar style. That doesn’t mean that it’s a bad thing, or that their style isn’t personal to themselves, but it can become a bit repetitive. So, here are a few of my own personal favourite Instagram fashion bloggers that don’t all follow that recurring style.

@mariejedig

Marie is the type of person that you look at and can’t quite put your finger on which aspect of her style you admire the most. Is it the colourful monochromatic styling? Is it her romanticised play with textures and cosy knits? Or is the combination of calming colours and cuddly cardigans just the perfect combination of C’s for an attractive insta feed?

Not only that, but her collaborative work features many new and upcoming brands, fresh from Scandinavia in more specifically. Many of which are ethically driven towards creating sustainable and eco-friendly garments, in which Marie uses her platform to style in fresh and contemporary ways.

Overall, her fun and flamboyant outfits are super refreshing in a world of all black and occasional neon green. Besides that, her not-so-serious styling is also a good influence to have on an audience, as fashion should be fun and enjoyable, without any feelings of pressure to dress in a particular way in order to be ‘stylish’.

@maria_bernad

Maria definitely gives me that cliche ‘cool girl in school that didn’t speak to anyone but nobody messed with her’ vibe that you see in all the American teen movies. She can clash as many prints as possible but still look effortless and put together, but in a cool way.

She finds a way to make everything and anything work together, no matter how tacky or outrageous the outfit may be. Purple sparkly flared trousers with a complimentary pink t-shirt? Who wouldn’t do that. You never know what type of day she’s dressing for or what she’s doing, but she looks prepared for anything, and that’s hot.

She can go from one extreme to the other, from an 80’s party go-er to a 90’s schoolgirl who spends her time between the library and skateboarding to school and back. The versatility in her styling is something so refreshing and exciting to see and I’d really recommend you gave her a follow, even if she’s not to your particular taste it’s just fun to see.

@Frollein_herr

Karoline Herr is a German fashion and interiors enthusiast that dedicates her instagram towards combining these two elements into one strong and visually pleasing feed. She’s a fan of soft and neutral tones in both of these areas, and she enjoys a more architectural play on shapes and proportions.

Her style is super feminine without necessarily being ‘girly’. It’s mature in a way that makes her look polished and flawless, but it doesn’t age her or look too dated.

Her images make a welcoming appearance, as they’re not too bombarding of brands or labels, just simply good style. In a world of instagram it’s hard to avoid materialism and caring too much about the status of items, but it’s easy to tell that Karoline looks to items for their beauty and inspiring qualities rather than the opposing ideas. Overall, she’s a pretty good person to be following.

@Karenbritchick

Ah Karen, you legend. Karen has been an all time favourite fashion admirer of mine since I properly got invested in the fashion world. A Brit now living in New York, she takes inspiration from both places within her wardrobe, and you can also find her documenting the street style of New York over on her YouTube channel (under the same username).

One thing that initially drawn me to Karen’s style was her heavy inclusion of vintage and second hand pieces. She speaks a lot of sustainable fashion and shopping ethically, and so her outfits reflect that same idea of timeless pieces: never outdated fashion.

She’s also a big fashion of jewel tones, fun textures, and vintage cuts. Wide or flared leg trousers are a common appearance, as well as a good turtleneck and chunky boots. By the way, she’s also super excited about clothes, and when I say excited, I MEAN excited, go to her YouTube to see exactly what I mean).

@jennymustard

Last but certainly not least, we have the wonderful Jenny Mustard. She’s originally from Sweden, but her and her boyfriend David have moved from capital to capital for many years now, and are currently residing in London! Her Scandinavian background plays a great influence on her wardrobe and her minimalist lifestyle, and she’s also a great enthusiast for veganism and social change as she discusses on her weekly podcast.

Jenny’s instagram features a very faff-free consistency, showcasing her chic and contemporary styling in her toned surroundings. She’s a lover of sustainability and she uses her platform to showcase some of Scandinavia’s best organic and ethical brands, whilst also going a step further on her YouTube channel to provide a variety of styling videos to help make the most out of your wardrobe.

Her style is never too much of anything, never too boyish or girly, never too put together or too laid back, it’s just right. She’s always one for outfit repeating (as we all should do) yet her ability to switch up an outfit to make it feel all brand new again is a great influence to have on your feed. 10/10 in my books if you ask me.

So that’s a few of my most favourite fashion bloggers, I hope you’ve enjoyed reading this and maybe even discovered a new account that you’re on your way to follow! Anyway, I’ll be back soon with anyone fun post.

Love,

Sophie x

The truth about designer purchases

Hello again! As I’m getting back into the swing of blogging and I’m currently feeling inspired, I thought I’d speak my mind on a particular topic that I’ve had a lot of thoughts on. Truth being told, it’s a bit of a marmite topic to say the least as everyone is either all for it or they see no point in it, and that topic my friends is luxury clothing.

Bag: Shrimps

Now this will most definitely be a very personal and very taboo conversation surrounding money, and I don’t want to pass off any kind of bragging or materialistic vibe within this piece, it’s just something that I feel like we need to be more open and honest about in order to make money less of a touchy subject and instead make it okay to say you’re struggling and need a bit of help.

Speaking from an honest and personal perspective, I’ve came from a family that has often at times struggled financially and thus growing up I’ve never been showered with expensive presents. Although my family is now in a stable and comfortable financial situation, I know that that’s not the case for a lot of people and the idea of spending money on things that aren’t necessities is just frivolous and a big mistake.

Coat: Shrimps, top: Alexa Chung, skirt: H&M, shoes: Depop (Dr Martens)

That being said, this is the first time in my life that I’ve ever had any kind of security. I now have savings and I’m budgeting my student loan, and I’m also working from time to time whenever I’m back home. Yet given this understanding of ‘I am fine for money’, I still have that guilt and caution about spending money and getting back to a past experience, as if it’s ingrained into my head. Yes in a way it’s a good thing, but it’s also such a negative thought process that has stopped me from doing what I want to do in the past and caused me to miss out on some great opportunities.

Now as to where designer items come into this story, as we all know the Christmas and January sales have been in everyone’s face recently. In that past I’d never even cared for looking at the discounts on websites like Selfridges or Net a Porter, as I couldn’t afford it so what was the point? Yes of course there were things that I’d be lusting over but I wasn’t actually considering buying them, it was just too extortionate. Yet after recently organising my savings and realising that I am financially stable, I realised that I could in fact buy these pieces that I’d been looking at for years. So I did.

Coat: Shrimps, top: vintage (Pop Boutique), jeans: Topshop, bag: gift

In my opinion, luxury pieces shouldn’t be bought because of their expensive look and the misinterpretation that they give off. When designer items become a trend and people buy into them even though they realistically wouldn’t have even considered buying that item 5 years ago, that’s when it’s a bad decision. Wanting an expensive item just simply because it fits your own personal style and you can imagine yourself wearing it in 10 years time, that’s what’s worth it.

I think that part of the stigma around designer purchases at a young age from other young people is heavily down to each persons background and what their lifestyle is now. Some people work full time jobs and get a steady income that they can easily afford to treat themselves whilst also setting themselves up for the future, whilst others are in education living on student loans whilst trying to get themselves in their dream career in the years to come. Some people live with their parents and don’t have many financial responsibilities whereas others can be the main provider for their household. To some people they wouldn’t even consider spending above a certain amount on clothing, whereas to others they’d have no reason not to.

Clothing is also seen as a pointless thing to spend all of your money on, because yes you can buy a handbag for £10 on the high street. But that same mentality can be applied to anything luxurious makeup, haircuts, tattoos, home decor, cars etc. There’s usually a price difference in these things due to the quality of the item and the care put into them, and especially how long they will last you for. Luxury clothing can be beautiful and practical and will save you a lot of money in the long run if it’s the right type of investment piece, so it’s not always about the flashiness of the new bag either.

It’s not a heavy topic in itself but the circumstances around it can often be similar or different to what you may have experienced, but it’s just a case of leaving people to do what they want with their money. Also money is just paper, yes it establishes things like a roof over your head and food on the table but if you’ve got that then you don’t need to rely on money for happiness. As long as you are okay financially and you can buy that coat or buy those shoes without it having a huge impact on your wellbeing, then fucking do it.

Apologises for the preachy tone but I just wanted to emphasise on how treating yourself does not need to have a guilty connotations along with it. This goes for luxury pieces or even little things like just buying a face mask because you want it. Again, if you’ll be okay without that money in your bank, you may as well buy it.

Lots of love,

Sophie x

Visuals No.3

My favourite second hand finds of 2019

Hi stranger, long time no see! I know it’s been ages since I’ve been active on the blog, but I’ve tried to focus on enjoying the festive period as much as possible whilst I was back home from uni. Now that I’m back in Leeds and getting into the swing of things again, I thought I’d kick start the new year in the best way with a bit of sustainability.

Now if you know me, you know that I’m a massive second hand shopping addict. Whether it be through depop, charity shops, vintage shops, I just can’t get enough of it. Not only that, but after years of skimming and scrolling, I’ve also developed a secret gift for spotting the best finds out there at an impressive bargain too.

Often I’ll share with my friends what I’ve found or what deal I’ve found, to which they always reply with encouragement for me to share some of them, which is what I thought I’d do today! So if this is your type of thing, then I hope it encourages you to shop second hand and be a bit more friendly to the environment (and to your bank account too!).

1. Miu Miu bag

Now this list doesn’t necessarily go in any particular order, but this bag I’m about to confess my love to you about is definitely up there as one of my most favourite second hand finds of all time. I do love a bit of Prada and their collections are usually very strong, but their sister brand Miu Miu just hits the nail on the head for me. Anyway, I’m on Depop one day and I see this beautifully made baby pink Miu Miu handbag that looks to be genuine and in great condition. I check the price, £45.

I was hesitant at first due to the ridiculously low starting price, so I messaged the girl about it. She said she had bought it on Depop herself but there’s no proof of authenticity. She also said that she’s pretty certain herself due to the quality and the finer details on the hardware that it’s genuine, and that she’s only selling it due to her lack of usage of the bag.

Although I had doubts in my head, I still ordered it. When it arrived I was truly shocked and agreed on her previous statement, everything was perfect, the Miu Miu embossing was perfect even down to the finer details on smaller hardware inside the bag. Basically, someone must have went to a ridiculous and expensive level of effort to rip off this bag. These bags usually retail for around £800, so you can imagine my shock when I realise that this definitely doesn’t seem like a fake.

As for the bag itself, I haven’t been able to stop wearing it. The shape and size is perfect, the shade of pink just works with everything, and the quality of the leather is incredible and has shown no signs of wear in the two or so months that I’ve had it. This is definitely an item that I’m going to treasure for a life time and even if I have kids, they’re not getting their hands on it.

2. Miu Miu velvet coat

Following on with my second and last Miu Miu item, this piece is one of my current favourites that I just can’t resist wearing, and which I also find is very well complimented by random strangers too, particularly on its stunning shade of dark green velvet. This Miu Miu military style coat was something that I’d spotted about two months ago, and the stunning shape and detailed embroidered patches really stood out to me. It was originally listed at £95 (which is already an incredible bargain) due to the previous owner wanting a quick sale.

Sometimes I will put an offer down that’s a little lower than what I’d be willing to pay, that way the seller is more inclined to meet in the middle to what you’d want. So I put an offer of £60 aiming to meet for around £80, to which the seller was a bit hesitant and didn’t accept straight away. As time went on, she progressively lowered her offers down until she got to £65, to which I happily accepted. And the rest was history.

This piece I’ve worn a fair few times already in the month that I’ve had it, and the velvet texture is surprisingly really durable. The military style is something that I feel like compliments my wardrobe that is slightly more on the feminine side than the average person, as I feel like it contrasts well with this, without making it clash too much. Thankfully I got it right in the middle of winter, so you’ll be seeing a lot more of this coat on my Instagram!

3. Matching Plaid jacket

This piece might seem like quite a random choice in comparison to the past two items, but the story behind it is quite surprising. So I never usually order from websites like Pretty Little Thing or Boohoo, but Missguided had a Barbie collab that featured this sweet little plaid skirt that I’ve worn so much over the past year or so. Now since I’ve moved to Leeds there’s some charity shops in my area that have a great selection from time to time, and as I was popping over to the shops to get some food, I thought I’d nip into this particular charity shop a few doors down.

I spent no longer than 10 minutes browsing around, a few things had caught my eye but nothing too exciting, then as I was about to leave I’d spotted this this nice plaid jacket. However, it was only when I’d picked it up that u realised that it was in fact the matching jacket to my skirt (which I didn’t know even existed) and it was in my exact size too. Of course I had to get it, especially due to the fact that I’d thought maybe once or twice about how nice the skirt would look as a co-ord set. These types of ‘what are the chances’ situations happen quite frequently when I’m shopping second hand, so majority of the time I never turn them down.

4. Alexa Chung Hardcore T-shirt

Something you may or may not know about me is that I collect a few things within my wardrobe, mainly for my own satisfaction but also for the chance that if I were to need a great deal of cash in a random scenario then I’m sorted. One area that is more for my own fulfilment is Alexa Chung t-shirts. I’m fond of her design process and I feel like graphic tees are so hard to get just right, without being too boring or too cheesy. So, the ones I look out for the most are the ones from her first few seasons. These t-shirts she designed are what I imagine to be her years worth of ideas for the perfect everyday slogan t-shirts that she would have kept in her mind until she started her brand, unleashing them to the public.

I already had quite a handful of her tees to start with, but there was one that I was wanting to get my hands on since it was first debuted a few years ago, this was the Hard Core t-shirt. A humorous but subtle play on words, with a timeless old English font in a block red shade, it just seemed like a great everyday piece. Now these t-shirts are very hard to come across on depop or eBay these days, so you can imagine my satisfaction when I come across one selling for £20 inc shipping (these t-shirts usually retail for about £75), in great condition and in my size. This piece has now became one of my favourites overall within my wardrobe and I get excited every time I get to wear it again.

5. Mary Jane Doc Martens

Last but certainly not least, and also my most recent addition, are my beautiful little Mary Jane docs. These babies I’d been admiring for years, from the early tumblr days to right now at the ripe old age of 20, the love never seemed to fade. I do actually have two other pairs of docs, both in a different shape and one of which was also a great depop find, but I was wanting just a classic plain black pair that would go with everything and would just simply do the job.

This exact pair I’d manage to find through a lovely seller on depop listing them at a humble £25. Considering I’d gotten so close to paying full price for these shoes, I’m so glad this opportunity arose. They came in brilliant condition with very minimal sights of actual wear and they fit just like a glove. As beautiful as they are there is of course the painful inevitably of the wearing in stage. So far this pair have been okay but as of yesterday I’ve began to get very small blisters, so I’m going to let them heal for a little while before I get back into the swing of pairing them with every outfit I wear.

So there we have some of my favourite second hand finds for 2019! It’s been quite a year to say the least but I’m content with these special finds that I’d picked up along the way, now for 2020 to bring even more gorgeous clothes and I hope that you all manage to stumble across your next obsession! I’ll be back on here soon now that I’m all prepped for the new year.

Lots of love,

Sophie x

1960’s fashion: music, miniskirts and Mary Quant

I’ve recently been doing a lot of research into the 1960’s fashion movements and the construction of how these styles came about and for what reasons, and since I’ve been so infatuated with the decade as a whole, I thought I’d share some of the key subjects that influenced womenswear of this time.

The 60’s saw a fashion focus on the younger generations, particularly on the teenage youth, as the change in music styles had also influenced them to desire clothes that they could move around in. The rising popularity of rock bands like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, went hand in hand with the frenzy of teenage girls that wanted to be with them and boys who wanted to be them.

Young girls didn’t want to dress as children anymore, and the older styles like Dior’s ‘New Look’ didn’t necessarily offer them much freedom physically, and thus this is where items such as the mini skirt were introduced. The super short manifestation was a bold style, suited to females who enjoyed the freedom of movement, or even to those who were heavily outspoken for women gaining a stronger role in society, in which the miniskirt was a modern style that didn’t fit the typical housewife agenda of the decade prior.

As the hemline was raised it became awkward to wear the traditional stockings, and so full length tights in bright block colours became the new fashion to suit this modern, youthful look. Mary Quant was a key designer for British youth at this time (and is also one of my personal favourite designers to this day) due to her recognition of young girls styling themselves and further feeding back what she saw them wearing in the streets, by supplying them with items such as these block coloured tights in a whole array of colours, which further formed this unique relationship between designer and customer.

Mary Quant was not the only important character in the 60’s love story, as who could forget about Twiggy? In her early days she was often compared to the equally beautiful Jean Shrimpton, who was seen to have more of a mature and classic feel than the young Twiggy, who at first had went by her real name Lesley Hornby. It was once her iconic pixie cut style was created, taking a whole 8 hours of bleaching and trimming in the House of Leonard salon in Wayfair, that ‘Twiggy’ was born.

Her super short cut and her doe eyes that she further brought out with defined eyeshadow, set a modern style for girls to recreate in their own way, to which obviously Mary Quant had supplied with her own makeup collections. Her makeup ranges included palettes that contained everything a girl could need in one item, including miniature brushes for girls to touch up with wherever they go, maybe on the way to a Beatles concert?

The youth quake of the 60’s has fascinated me a lot recently, as the parallels with not just the fashion industry today but society itself is undeniable. Social media helps to fuel our fearlessness of self expression and standing up for what is right, as the many many online movements since it’s birth is too many to count. Brands turn more towards street style and what the customer is wearing, which has usually been found second hand, as the superior fashion houses are lacking in imagination and awareness of what young people today actually want. And thus, history repeats itself.

Thanks for reading through this little homage to the 60’s, I hope you enjoyed it and even maybe learnt something new about this influential decade!

Sophie x

Visuals No.2

Festive season outfits

Hello hello! It’s been a short while since I’ve wrote on here (I’m currently fully invested in the uni life right now) but I thought I’d take some time to have a good browse at some of the amazing festive season party outfits that are out at the minute. These were all heavily inspired by my 2020 trend forecasting post I wrote back in the summer, but the roaring 20’s is most definitely the predominant theme across all of these looks!

Now I know I preach about sustainability in most of my topics, which I do fully stand by, but it’s highly unrealistic that the everyday person and people who may be on a tighter budget would be able to afford to get dressed up and fancy whilst still being 100% ethical and all the other faff that goes along with it. SO, I’ve combined a few popular online stores that I know people will be confident in the sizing and general quality of the pieces, and so that you can be sure to get a great outfit in time for the festive season.

Nastygal

To kick things off, Nastygal currently have a huge range of party wear available to suit everyone’s styles and shapes, but this blazer did certainly catch my eye! Wear over a turtleneck for a more formal approach, or on its own for more of a bold statement. Maybe you could pair it with this necklace set for some added details? If blazers aren’t necessarily your type of thing, maybe a simple satin dress can do the talking. Either way, both of these looks would be incredible with an oversized fur coat on top.

Missguided

I decided to have a quick browse on Missguided just to see what the options were, and boy they’ve really went the extra mile with the party looks. With an obvious influence from early 2000’s Paris Hilton in mind, this over the top pink organza dress would definitely grant you the best dressed title at the work Christmas do. If you like the idea but you’re wanting something a bit more subtle, maybe this subtle pink velvet mini dress could be a good idea. Alternatively, you could go the complete opposite route and go for this classic suit, in a nice velvet blazer and trousers combo. To keep your feet looking glam too, these diamante heels would definitely tie the whole look together.

ASOS

ASOS is the one that I’d definitely give the highest rating to in terms of nailing that 20’s style New Years outfit. From a matching fringed skirt and crop top set, to an embellished super cropped top that could work over any cute slip dresses, they’ve done a good job. If you really wanted to go fully on theme, then this embellished dress with added feather details is surely what you’re looking for. As for shoes, these star print mules add both comfort and fun to your outfit as you dance away into 2020.

So that’s all of the amazing party pieces that I have to share with you today, be sure to let me know if you purchase any of them! I hope December brings along many fun nights out and a lot of good booze.

Sophie x

Visuals No.1

(All images via Pinterest)

New Romantics: would you dress up as a nun on a night out?

Shifting from the punk movement, the 80’s youth still felt neglected by Thatcher’s political agenda and the people involved in this climate. They wanted escapism from this unwelcoming society, without the politics or aggressive tone of the punks. They wanted to fantasise and dress-up without anyone telling them they couldn’t. Thus came the New Romantic period.

Founded within London’s nightclubs such as ‘The Blitz’ and ‘Billy’s’ where popular New Romantic artists like David Bowie and Duran Duran were played, youngsters pushed for a night of fun and extravagance that let them enjoy some time away from their day to day lives. Where instead of being a nobody in a general public, they could be anyone they wanted to be within a club of 70.

Whether it be a nun with 2 foot crimped hair or a pirate with a taste for pink eyeshadow, there were no limitations on what was suitable. There was no gender, background or expectations, it was all just expression and enlightenment. This freedom was what they lacked in the punk period. They no longer wanted to wear a t-shirt of the Queen with crude graffiti on it, they wanted to forget the t-shirt all together and dress in something completely unrelated to any person of political hierarchy.

The styles of the individuals attending these nightclubs were often inspired by the glam rock era and the early romantic period of the late 18th century/early 19th century. People were often characterised by flamboyant and eccentric fashion boutiques such as PX in London and Kahn & Bell in Birmingham, which helped them to explore this new style that had never been played around with before for everyday use.

It’s quite ridiculous to believe that this shift in styles even developed from the punk movement, yet to think that it even existed at all is quite remarkable for the 1980’s. To this day designers still look to this era of fashion for some current day escapism from the same old designs and themes that the industry whacks out each season.

If there’s anything you should take from this post, I’d say to think about the possibility of a reincarnation of the New Romantics era that we could be experiencing right now. No we might not be going out dressed as Jesus or using white face paint as foundation, but the sudden surge of maximalist styles and themes is undeniable.

Festival wear has turned from comfort clothes to every girl needing to find a new outfit that nobody else in a field of 20,000 will have. Drag shows are more popular than ever now. The Met Gala is more anticipated than any fashion week all year round because of how imaginative, unwearable yet artistic it is.

So, do I think we’re going into a maximalist period? Definitely. Will the New Romantic era play a more dominant role in future influences in style, make-up and art? Quite possibly. Are we in need of some imagination and fun in this dull fashion industry? 100%.

Thanks for reading this quick discussion on new romantic style, I was wanting to write something as a form of stress relief so I thought I’d combine it with a topic that I was looking at for my uni work. I’ll be sure to see you again soon with another fun topic, but be sure to let me know if you’d like more history based themes like this!

Thanks again,

Sophie x